Pastry Chef Tip #1 ~ Silcone baking mats vs. parchment paper

In the pastry world there are many secrets that chefs hold close to the vest.  However, in this blog I hope to share some products, tips, and tricks that will make your time in the kitchen more enjoyable, less messy, and save you money with less waste.   Videos are coming, but for now I hope you enjoy the read and share this with your friends!

  What is Silpat®? I confess, I had never heard of a silicone baking mat before I attended the French Pastry School in Chicago.  Now there are many brands to choose from,  but I stuck with the Demarle brand that we used everyday at FPS. Silpat® is known around the world as the original non-stick baking liner.  Silpat liners are made of fiberglass and food grade silicone and are completely food safe.  They are much more economical and versatile than parchment paper.  They don't wrinkle, rip or tear, scorch, aren't destroyed by water, and the average life is over 2,500 baking times.  They come in a variety of sizes to suit all your baking needs and are oven safe up to 480 degrees. Sasa Demarle Inc. was founded in 1965 by M. Guy Demarle in Northern France. So what do I use the little mini one for shown in the picture?   It's my favorite little mat to house my spatulas, piping bags, measuring cups and spoons.  It is little, so sometimes I play an unintentional round of Jenga to get everything to fit.  Basically, I use it for anything that is sticky that would dirty my counter workspace.  I also use it on top of my induction burner to catch any splatters or spills to keep the burner clean.  Or when I have small test item or the last couple of a batch to bake, I can place them directly on the Silpat and sheet pan before putting in the oven.  (The Silpats are NOT designed to be placed in direct contact with the oven racks.)  You'll find a variety of different uses for them.  Just remember to hand wash them, store them flat or rolled, and do NOT cut on them.   If you cut it, call me and I'll cry with you!  Disclaimer:  I or Beyond Decadence do not receive any compensation or free product for the items reviewed.  These are products I use everyday in my kitchen and just happen to love.   Decadently yours, Chef Maria   .    

 

What is Silpat®?

I confess, I had never heard of a silicone baking mat before I attended the French Pastry School in Chicago.  Now there are many brands to choose from,  but I stuck with the Demarle brand that we used everyday at FPS.

Silpat® is known around the world as the original non-stick baking liner.  Silpat liners are made of fiberglass and food grade silicone and are completely food safe.  They are much more economical and versatile than parchment paper.  They don't wrinkle, rip or tear, scorch, aren't destroyed by water, and the average life is over 2,500 baking times.  They come in a variety of sizes to suit all your baking needs and are oven safe up to 480 degrees.

Sasa Demarle Inc. was founded in 1965 by M. Guy Demarle in Northern France.

So what do I use the little mini one for shown in the picture?  

It's my favorite little mat to house my spatulas, piping bags, measuring cups and spoons.  It is little, so sometimes I play an unintentional round of Jenga to get everything to fit.  Basically, I use it for anything that is sticky that would dirty my counter workspace.  I also use it on top of my induction burner to catch any splatters or spills to keep the burner clean.  Or when I have small test item or the last couple of a batch to bake, I can place them directly on the Silpat and sheet pan before putting in the oven.  (The Silpats are NOT designed to be placed in direct contact with the oven racks.) 

You'll find a variety of different uses for them.  Just remember to hand wash them, store them flat or rolled, and do NOT cut on them.   If you cut it, call me and I'll cry with you! 

Disclaimer:  I or Beyond Decadence do not receive any compensation or free product for the items reviewed.  These are products I use everyday in my kitchen and just happen to love.  

Decadently yours,

Chef Maria

 

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Maria Kemp8 Comments